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How To Start and Operate a Dog Walking and Pet Sitting Business

These sessions of "How To Start and Operate a Dog Walking and Pet Sitting Business" will take you from the very beginning, when you're only thinking about starting this business, to organizing it and finally to the point where you will collect your fees in checks or credit card payments.
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Now displaying: January, 2016
Jan 29, 2016

In this session of How To Start and Manage a Dog Walking and Pet Sitting Business, I’m going to introduce you to the very important topic of Marketing.
 
Marketing is the process of letting the buying public … potentially your customers … know that you’re in business as well as what your business is all about.

I recommend that you sign up with www.thumbtack.com.

Go to https://www.craigslist.org/about/sites#US and find the particular craigs list that is closest to you.

For quality printing at a reasonable price go to www.vistaprint.com

Start a free website with Blogger at www.blogger.com

Keep sending me your questions and comments to  dogwalkerpodcast@gmail.com or go to the dogwalkerpodcast facebook page at www.facebook.com/dogwalkerpodcast and leave your comments or questions there.

 

Jan 11, 2016

In this session of How To Start and Manage a Dog Walking and Pet Sitting Business, I'm going to talk to you about book keeping and accounting.

1. Daily Service Calls

Service Calendar

 

 

Monday, January 04, 2016

9:00 AM

Customer 1 (M-F)

 

9:45 AM

Customer 2 (M-F)

 

10:30 AM

Customer 3 (M, W, F)

 

11:15 AM

Customer 4 (M-F)

 

1:00 PM

Customer 5 (Tu, Th)

 

 

 

Tuesday, January 05, 2016

9:00 AM

Customer 1 (M-F)

 

9:45 AM

Customer 2 (M-F)

 

11:15 AM

Customer 4 (M-F)

 

1:00 PM

Customer 5 (Tu, Th)

 

 

 

Wednesday, January 06, 2016

9:00 AM

Customer 1 (M-F)

 

9:45 AM

Customer 2 (M-F)

 

10:30 AM

Customer 3 (M, W, F)

 

11:15 AM

Customer 4 (M-F)

 

 

 

Thursday, January 07, 2016

9:00 AM

Customer 1 (M-F)

 

9:45 AM

Customer 2 (M-F)

 

1:00 PM

Customer 5 (Tu, Th)

 

 

 

Friday, January 08, 2016

9:00 AM

Customer 1 (M-F)

 

9:45 AM

Customer 2 (M-F)

 

10:30 AM

Customer 3 (M, W, F)

 

11:15 AM

Customer 4 (M-F)

 

2. Customer Payments

 

Client

Rec'vd

Check #

Amount

Tot Earn

Jan

Customer 1

01/04/16

#2778

$100.00

$100.00

 

Customer 2

01/04/16

#2031

$100.00

$200.00

 

Customer 3

01/04/16

#154

$60.00

$260.00

 

Customer 4

01/04/16

#1713

$100.00

$360.00

 

Customer 5

01/04/16

#3654

$40.00

$400.00

 

 

Balance Forward

$0.00

 

 

 

Ch # 2778

$100.00

 

Fee

Customer 1 (M-F)

Total Credit

$100.00

 

$20.00

 

Monday, January 11, 2016

$80.00

$20.00

 

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

$60.00

$20.00

 

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

$40.00

 

$20.00

 

Thursday, January 14, 2016

$20.00

 

$20.00

 

Friday, January 15, 2016

$0.00

 

$20.00

 

3. Running Totals of Customer Payments

Client

2016 Cum

Customer 1

$100.00

Customer 2

$100.00

Customer 3

$60.00

Customer 4

$100.00

Customer 5

$40.00

 

Then next time Customer 1 pays you another $100 for the following week’s of walks, add that $100 to the existing $100 to make it $200 in the 2016 Cum (for Cumulative) column. Do that for every customer and you’ll see how much each one of your customers pays you over time.

 

4. Monthly Income

 

Jan (1)

Feb (2)

Mar (3)

Apr (4)

May (5)

Jun (6)

Sub-Total

2016

$400.00

 

 

 

 

 

$400.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jul (7)

Aug (8)

Sep (9)

Oct (10)

Nov (11)

Dec (12)

Total

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

$400.00

 

Using our example of 5 customers who pay you a total of $400 per month, you can use this simple set-up to track your monthly income as well as your 6-month midpoint income as well as your annual income. As your business grows, your monthly income will grow along with it.

 

5. Running Total Income and Tax burden

Tot Earn

32% Taxes

Taxes

$100.00

$32.00

$32.00

$200.00

$32.00

$32.00

$260.00

$19.20

$51.20

$360.00

$32.00

$83.20

$400.00

$12.80

$96.00

 

These cells should be added at the end of the cells of 2. Customer Payments above. I’m using the formula that you will have to pay around 32% of your income to State and Federal tax agencies. This will allow you to set aside in your savings account the amount of money that you should pay quarterly. If you pay your taxes on April 15, the IRS will charge you an interest rate for not having paid your quarterly taxes on time. 6. Expenses by Category

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Date

Vendor

Purpose

Account

Amount

Sls Tax

Totals

1/4/2016

Vendor 1

2 leashes

20b Equip

$25.00

$1.50

$26.50

1/6/2016

Vendor 2

Off Supplies

18 Off Supp

$43.64

$2.62

$46.26

In this example I’m noting that I’ve made two business expenditures. I’ve noted the actual amounts with a separate notation for the Sales Tax which you’ll be able to deduct from your income taxes. Note that I’ve used the IRS 1040, Schedule C designations in the Account column, namely 20b and 18. You can do this if you have a Schedule C in your files for a reference. This will make it easier at tax time to itemize your deductions. You’ll add up all of your #20b expenses and then your #18 expenses as well as all of your other expenses and include those sums in your Schedule C. It’s much simpler than it sounds, really! 

Internet sources cited in this session …

dogwalkerpodcast@gmail.com

www.facebook.com/dogwalkerpodcast

Google “free basic accounting and bookkeeping courses online

https://www.irs.gov/

http://www.gnucash.org/

www.turbotax.com/

 

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